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“Super Samoan”
20″x24″ Acrylic

Reposted frommilo317 milo317 viaKobajashi Kobajashi
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stachionalgeographic:

sydney-leathers:

Two cats being interrupted by themselves from an alternate dog dimension

It isn’t worth it!

Reposted fromsleepingmisery sleepingmisery viawasnae wasnae
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delta-breezes:

Emily Jeffords | @emily_jeffords

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eclipse.
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Sarah Connor
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In the 1985 Terry Gilliam dystopian film, Brazil, there is a short scene wherein the protagonist, Sam, phones into the “Central Services” to get his heating and air conditioning fixed. He finds his requests dispassionately and politely declined. Amusingly, renegade repairman Archibald Tuttle intercepts the request and infiltrates Sam’s apartment in order to repair his air conditioning. This, of course, is a dangerous and highly illegal endeavor- “Central Services” eventually seizes Sam’s apartment because of the unauthorized repairs. Apple would be proud. In Brazil, Gilliam frames Tuttle, the third party repairman, as a literal subversive. To me, the third party repairmen who fix cracked IPhone screens are probably not that far off Gilliam’s Archibald Tuttle.
Reading cyberpunk as a guide to surviving hyper consumerism - Cyborgology
Reposted fromwonko wonko viaRK RK
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>> Oben sehen Sie das Waffenarsenal eines Hamburger Neonazis. Unten das Waffenarsenal eines Rostocker Linksextremisten. Über letzteres berichteten nach einer Presskonferenz der Hamburger Polizei nahezu alle Medien. Von ersterem erfährt die Öffentlichkeit nur dank hartnäckiger Recherchen der taz. die tageszeitung. Die ganze Geschichte hier:

http://www.taz.de/!5433015/ <<

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1091234424347560&id=268450883292589

#fcknzs #fckcps #acan #acab

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Scientists Create DNA-Based Exploit of a Computer System

Archeron writes:

It seems that scientists at University of Washington in Seattle have managed to encode malware into genomic data, allowing them to gain full access to a computer being used to analyze the data. While this may be a highly contrived attack scenario, it does ask the question whether we pay sufficient attention to data-driven exploits, especially where the data is instrument-derived. What other systems could be vulnerable to a tampered raw data source? Perhaps audio and RF analysis systems?
MIT Technology Review reports: "To carry out the hack, researchers led by Tadayoshi Kohno and Luis Ceze encoded malicious software in a short stretch of DNA they purchased online. They then used it to gain 'full control' over a computer that tried to process the genetic data after it was read by a DNA sequencing machine. The researchers warn that hackers could one day use faked blood or spit samples to gain access to university computers, steal information from police forensics labs, or infect genome files shared by scientists. To make the malware, the team translated a simple computer command into a short stretch of 176 DNA letters, denoted as A, G, C, and T. After ordering copies of the DNA from a vendor for $89, they fed the strands to a sequencing machine, which read off the gene letters, storing them as binary digits, 0s and 1s. Yaniv Erlich, a geneticist and programmer who is chief scientific officer of MyHertige.com, a genealogy website, says the attack took advantage of a spill-over effect, when data that exceeds a storage buffer can be interpreted as a computer command. In this case, the command contacted a server controlled by Kohno's team, from which they took control of a computer in their lab they were using to analyze the DNA file." You can read their paper here.
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feeding little birds
Reposted fromOhJohnny OhJohnny viamushu mushu
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